Archive for the ‘Xamination’ Category

I am listening to Tuface’s song Raindrops from the album Unstoppable- The International Version.

Unlike in the song Enter the Place where he makes a mere reference to his “wayward” lifestyle and then in a boastful unrepentant way (“Enter the place make we see if you no go carry bele too…”), the entire Raindrop song is inspired by this period in his life.

It touches on regret, remorse and repentance. But while he regrets, it is not entirely as he sees the results of “mistakes” (his children) as a “blessing in disguise”.

In his usual uncannily blunt way, he dolts out advice to young men who may be tempted to follow in his footsteps and this is the funniest part of the song “Young man… be careful before you choose to… use your device…”

He blames the women then concedes that he wasn’t raped. He thanks those who counseled him when all seemed to be getting out of hand and accuses those who were only too happy to see him fall…

This is one of Tuface best work yet in terms of message, lyrics and rhythm. The accompanyiny music is inspired by his reggae roots and its one that blends so well with the theme of the song.

The rain has been pouring outside all morning as I sit here at my desk typing out these words and listening to the song for the umpteenth time but not merely because of the title. There is one hell of a heavenly music on this song!


Onyinye Muomah

From top to bottom, No. 5 to No. 1

D’Banj, Fall In Love

Well, the kiss didn’t ‘werk’ for me, but what the hell! The fact that there was one (between D’Banj and Genevieve to boot!) makes it a must watch.
D’Banj seriously needs a choreographer though.
Genevieve’s make-up was a little bit piled on making her unrecognisable @ 1:14. The friend’s more subtle look almost stole the shine from her.

Wande Coal ft K-switch, Na Who Born the Maga

The song sounds like and sends almost the same message has D’Banj’s If you dey crase.
Not-bad visual effects. Love the lions, wish they had been real though! The vault scene speaks of a very good imagination.
Thumbs up for choreography. Wande’s flip? Now that was something, not perfectly executed but something!

Djinee, Overkilling

Yeah, this one is a bit older than the rest. But you have to agree that Djinee overkilled!!!
The effects are to die for, literally. Love all the darkness, fire and explosions!!!
Loved especially all the “mean” looks!!!

9ice, No be Mistake

Hafiz Oyetoro seriously helped this video!!! Loved his dancing @ 3:37
Five stars for video quality.
9ice moves just went to prove that most Nigerian artists need personal choreographers. It’s one thing dancing for fun, totally different when its for a video.

AND THE NUMBER 1 VIDEO!!!

P Square ft J. Martins, E No Easy

Now this is what a video should look like! Did we give No Be Mistake 5 stars for video quality? Well, that’s for regular Naija standards. This one gets 5 stars for international standards!!
Love the colours!!! Yellow, white and purple, black: it’s like a throwback to their Get Squared video.
The Limos!!! The Limo effects!!! Getting in one place, coming out at- let’s say- Asia.
The Michael Jackson jackets- now, that’s the P Square style!!! J. Martins cleaned up real good too!!!
The choreography was minimal but well done as usual!!!
There was an overdose of girls though but it’s all good, some people like such things 🙂

EnGees is inspired!!! And P Square, going places (like the BET Awards, for example!!!)

You can re-sort this list and also add your own favorite! Have a lovely weekend!!!

P SQUARE FT J. MARTINS E NO EASY

October 21, Chude Jideonwo wrote a review. October 26, Ohimai Amaize wrote a rejoinder. October 27, Chude responded. And now, it’s the return of Ohimai. Is it just me or is this some real Hip-Hop ish going on in this here arena. Who will get ethered when it’s all said and done?

Seriously though, this is an important debate that relates to the current state of music in this place. Was Chude’s review really malicious? Was ID Cabasa’s album really that bad? Is Nigerian music (heck, music in general these days) really as good as we make it out to be? Do we truly celebrate mediocrity or do we fail to give deserved credit when due? Are we too sensitive or personal? Or is it that we are easily blinded and influenced? Whatever the case, we clearly have a discussion on our hands. Piracy is not the only problem with our music, the music itself is a problem. How do we move it forward? That is the question we should be asking.

Anyway, this post features Ohimai’s response to Chude’s response (read post below) to Ohimai’s rejoinder (read here) to Chude’s review (read here) on ID Cabasa’s debut album, ID.Entity. Let us know your thoughts on this whole fiasco, misunderstanding or whatever you want to call it.

A Journalist’s Demonisation of Dissent

By Ohimai Godwin Amaize

Knowing Chude Jideonwo, I am not surprised that my Monday Oct. 26, 2009 rejoinder to his review of ID Cabasa’s album of Wednesday Oct. 21, 2009 both published by NEXT newspapers has elicited malicious outbursts from him in what may be termed a hastily written and venom-filled counter-rejoinder titled “Help! There is in fact a crisis!”

The truth is there is no crisis. Grudges I cannot harbour; enmity I cannot afford. Indeed, a million friends are not enough; one enemy is too much. There is so much work to be done about the future of our generation; chiefly among which is the need for us to uphold the values of truth and integrity at all times regardless of the consequences. What I simply did with my rejoinder was to call critical attention to the destructive elements which characterised his review of ID Cabasa’s new album. Whether he has the right to write a music review was never at issue.

Not known for throwing wild allegations, I unearthed hard undisputable facts about his journalistic past which cast a shadow of doubt over the true intentions of his review of the ID Cabasa album. I didn’t conjure these facts. Chude, in the reality of his own past, created them.

All that one expected from such a promising writer was for him to disprove the facts I presented with his own dose of factual journalism. But no, he simply diverts attention and re-invents the wheel in a shifting goal post of wild counter allegations – all in a bid to discredit and demonise an articulate disagreement to his review.

In this counter rejoinder, Chude’s limited understanding of an objective album review is hinged on the sole idea that the directive to write the review emanated from his boss. But does this dispel the possibility of infusing his personal bias in the review? He himself admitted in the review that he listened to the album once. How could he possibly do a critical review of a thirteen-track album he listened to just once? Is this the new standard of journalism?

What is more? The young man himself confessed that he was under pressure from his boss to turn in the album review. What can one make of an album review that was hastily written under pressure in an attempt to beat the newsroom deadline? Can it be validly deduced that the reviewer did this review in his right frame of mind?

Taking this a bit further, beyond the creative liberties that characterise media practice, what really guarantees Chude’s competence in the review of music albums? Did he go to a music school? Is he a musician or a certified scholar in popular culture studies? What is the level of his competence in the Yoruba language – the language through which ID Cabasa’s album was predominantly rendered? Is it possible for a journalist who has just a basic knowledge of a particular language to do a critical to review of an album in that language?

Let somebody remind this young journalist that his so-called ‘gormless’ critics are probably not as sheepishly naive as to understand that commending a man one moment and condemning him the other moment does not always qualify as a gesture of objectivity. History is replete with examples.

In the twist of untidy logic, he declares that he was part of a process that crowned ID Cabasa Producer of the Year 2008. Very true. And we are also aware that a popular publisher of a national daily was part of the process that crowned Babatunde Fashola of Lagos state, Governor of the Year 2008 – an award the governor later rejected and returned to its organisers.

The crux of this whole matter is too straightforward for anyone to resort to throwing diversionary tantrums and employing smear tactics capable of destroying cherished relationships and more importantly, sacrificing professional standards on the altar of destructive newspaper publications in the name of the right to hold opinions. No one is asking anyone to write favourable album or music reviews all the time. No one is asking anyone to celebrate mediocrity. What someone is simply saying is let’s do this constructively!

Nowhere in his counter rejoinder did he deny labelling ID Cabasa’s album with snide remarks like “a lazy effort”, “a muted disaster”, “a bad album” or to make matters worse, his infamous advocacy for the album to be “banished from the airwaves.” Is this tantamount to constructive or destructive criticism?

In the final analysis, journalists in an open society, are not demi-gods whose opinions cannot be subjected to constructive criticisms. A journalist who feels too big or lacks the temperament to tolerate and accept constructive criticism and then goes out of his way to demonise dissenting views is not ready for the job.

There is a prize of honour to earn in this profession. It’s more than just getting the job done. It’s about getting it done the right and honourable way. Dele Olojede did not write his way to the Pulitzer in this manner, not to cite CNN’s recognition of the literary prowess of Tolu Ogunlesi – all who are Chude’s colleagues at NEXT.

Ohimai Godwin Amaize is Creative Director at the Youth Media & Communication Initiative (YMCI), Abuja

Stepahnie is in a new place in her life (photo: Moussa Moussa)

Stepahnie is in a new place in her life (photo: Moussa Moussa)

Michaela Moye

Nollywood darling Stephanie Okereke has stepped up. The actress, who is a recent graduate of the New York Film Academy, premiered her directorial debut at Silverbird Galleria, Lagos this past Sunday, 13 September.

The usual suspects were present: red carpet, white limo, hours-long tardiness and the ubiquitous rude “service providers” in the form of waitresses and ushers.

After much delay a montage of, frankly, disturbing images of her 2005 accident served as pre-movie entertainment – that and Patrick Doyle’s booming, oft-annoying commentary.

In true Naija style, Stephanie gave a speech (again)! This is after all the yakking that went on at the cocktail pavilion o! Anyway, she said: “You are not here to see the best movie ever made.”

Of course, the oyibo co-stars were made to run the speech gauntlet (Well, technically, only Christy Williams, who plays Nicole in the film, is oyibo. Impossibly cute Brion Rose is African-American).

When the tape began rolling on Through The Glass (at last), it felt kinda weird to hear Nollywood theme music in a Hollywood film. My first thought was whether D’banj & co. were getting their royalties.

The movie itself is pretty good. There were a few blank spaces but that happens in every film. It’s obvious that Stephanie now knows what she’s doing (at least as far as making movies is concerned).

After the premiere, gift bags were handed out and there was a raffle draw (I just grabbed my freebies and ran out – good thing too: bumped into 2Face on the way downstairs!).

The after-party held at the tres swanky Clear Essence Spa (don’t have photos yet, sorry!).

But you can check out the premiere red carpet: All photos by Femi Kuti

Yes people, apleasant start to a photo gallery

Yes people, a pleasant start to a photo gallery

There's Kanayo O. Kanayo (in the white caftan) who recently attended the hunger strike rally against piracy. Doesn't look like this saint is fasting

There's Kanayo O. Kanayo (in the white caftan) who recently attended the hunger strike rally against piracy. Doesn't look like this saint is fasting

And here is Nollywood hunk Chidi Mokeme. I wonder if his outfit is from his line. I also wonder if he and his lady friends planned to wear matching silver (check out his loafers)

And here is Nollywood hunk Chidi Mokeme. I wonder if his outfit is from his line. I also wonder if he and his lady friends planned to wear matching silver (check out his loafers)

John Fashanu: Gosh, I'm gorgeous! Wish I had a third arm though Left-out dude: What's with the three-way handshake? This must be some weird ritual greeting. wonder if it'll make National Geographic?

John Fashanu: Gosh, I'm gorgeous! Wish I had a third arm though Left-out dude: What's with the three-way handshake? This must be some weird ritual greeting. wonder if it'll make National Geographic?

Guy in strange clothes: Ha! Dude, what are you wearing? Silver shoes? C'mon! Chidi Mokeme: I'm Chidi Mokeme. I'm hot. Ladies love me and I can wear silver shoes and leave my shirt unbuttoned and I would still look cool because... Other Guy: I get it. You're Chidi Mokeme. Chidi Mokeme: And to quote Perez Hilton, Fergie, you're fugly! Other guy: I'm not Fergie. CM: Well no one knows who you are...

Guy in strange clothes: Ha! Dude, what are you wearing? Silver shoes? C'mon! Chidi Mokeme: I'm Chidi Mokeme. I'm hot. Ladies love me and I can wear silver shoes and leave my shirt unbuttoned and I would still look cool because... GSC: I get it. You're Chidi Mokeme. CM: And to quote Perez Hilton, Fergie, you're fugly! GSC: I'm not Fergie. CM: Well, no one knows who you are...

Hey, look! You tie matches my dress...well, almost

Hey, look! You tie matches my dress...well, almost

"Yes, darling! I have dispensed with my natural eyebrows. I find that black kohl is more fetching and blends so well with my blonde weave and red lipstick...so Marilyn Monroe. Don't you think?"

"Yes, darling! I have dispensed with my natural eyebrows. I find that black kohl is more fetching and blends so well with my blonde weave and red lipstick...so Marilyn Monroe. Don't you think?"

Looks like Saint Obi is about to give Patrick Doyle the finger

Looks like Saint Obi is about to give Patrick Doyle the finger

Ah, there it is!

Ah, there it is!

The limo's been spotted, press dash forward to get the best shot and the requisite baby to be kissed is produced. Or it could just be she forgot it was a baby and not a camera. Or she's pretending her baby is a camera...There are so many ways to read this...

The limo's been spotted, press dash forward to get the best shot and the requisite baby to be kissed is produced. Or it could just be she forgot it was a baby and not a camera. Or she's pretending her baby is a camera...There are so many ways to read this...

They're here! Chrissy Williams and Brion Rose were dressed by Nigerian designers - TYL Couture and MAI, respectively

They're here! Chrissy Williams and Brion Rose were dressed by Nigerian designers - TYL Couture and MAI, respectively

Ready for the close-up

Ready for the close-up

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